British golfer’s father wins £100,000 on a bet he made a decade ago

Rory McIlroy and His Father

When Rory McIlroy was just 15-years-old, he was already starting to show signs of becoming the next great European golfer. He helped the European team win the Junior Ryder Cup in 2004 and went on to win a number of amateur titles. His father, Gerry, decided to put some money on his son’s success. Gerry McIlroy and a group of three friends put money on Rory to win the British Open before the age of 26.

Fast forward 10 years, and Rory McIlroy is a British Open champion. He turned 25 last May, which means his father and his father’s friends will cash in for £200,000 pounds, or about $85,400 per person. McIlroy, who got a huge hug from his dad after walking off the 18th green, said in his post-round press conference that “the other 3 men that he did that with, they’re going to be very happy.”

Gerry, 52, and his wife, Rosie, are credited with a crucial influence on Rory’s stunning rise to golfing prominence. Gerry at one stage worked 100 hours per week to fund Rory’s participation in amateur events. “From 12pm to 6pm I was a bartender at Holywood Golf Club, then, after going home for tea, I’d return to the sports club from 7pm-midnight to work behind the bar,” he said in 2009. “I am a working-class man and that’s all I knew, to get the money we needed for Rory to be able to learn and compete at golf,” he added. Read more about the story here.

 

 

 

Alexa Rodriguez Attacked by Hawk at Fenway Park

HawkStrange things happen. Coincidences happen. In sports, there are superstitions, rituals, and omens that would get most people at least a little spooked.

When 13 year old Alexa Rodriguez went on a school trip to visit Fenway Park, there were probably more than a few references made about “A-Rod” from the New York Yankees coming to visit their arch rivals in Boston. What Alexa and her friends didn’t know was that a hawk would try to protect it’s lone egg nested in the overhang near the stadium’s press booth by attacking the unsuspecting 8th grader.

According to ESPN, Vince Jennetta, a teacher who chaperoned her class trip from Memorial Boulevard Middle School in Bristol, Conn., told The Boston Globe that Alexa is “a little shaken, but OK.”

The hawk’s talons drew blood from her head. State wildlife officials had the egg and nest removed.

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Final 4 Climax Means NFL Finishes 1 Month Break

NFLThe marketing and sales machine that is the National Football League maintains a strangle-hold on sports news for most of the year. Every month, there is something going on that dominates ESPN Sportscenter. Every month except March.

No, the only truly America sport allows one month for other sports to take the complete spotlight. As of the time of this post, there is only one top story on the Worldwide Leader in Sports coming from pigskin land, and it’s really only “charged” because of off-the-field actions. Pacman thinks his time is done with the Titans. It’s not a shocker, but I guess there has to be something about the NFL at all times.

History has been made in this NCAA Tournament. For the first time, all 4 #1 Seeds advanced to the Final 4. In a tournament that started off with such hope of mega-upsets, there is a sort of justice that FINALLY the 4 teams that were supposed to make it actually did make it. Otherwise, a lack of super-talent has made this a lackluster tournament compared to some of the recent ones.

And the NFL waits. It stretches, bounces, pumps its legs in place, and prepares for the official start of the NFL season hype machine. The NFL Draft and all of the combines, workouts, rumors, trades, trade rumors, background checks, and fabricated news angles officially mark the start of the marathon. Words will start to pop into every interview and commentary during this time such as “upside”, “intangibles”, “transition”, “speed in pads”, “mock drafts”, and “more mock drafts”. All this, and that’s BEFORE the actual draft.

We will see training camps, talk of hold-outs, and discuss depth charts. Speculation of break-out seasons, sleeper teams, and the obligatory Peyton vs Tom arguments will ensue.

The the preseason hits, and more people will watch football games that don’t count than baseball games that do. We finally get to the season, watch 17 weeks of it, then a long playoff, finally culminating in the Super Bowl and Pro Bowl in February.

Then, we’ll take another break from the NFL to watch March Madness. From a business perspective, 11 out of 12 ain’t bad.

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I am a sports journalist in my own mind. Read the occasional sports analysis at Noozeez.